EIA Reports on U.S. Energy Consumption History – 11/16/16

Energy consumption in the United States has changed significantly over the past hundred years, according to data collected by the EIA.

In 1908, the country consumed just 15 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu), of which 75% was coal, compared to 1997 when it totaled 94 quadrillion Btu with coal’s share of total consumption reaching only 25% and with significantly higher shares for natural gas and nuclear power.

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The share of nonhydro renewable consumption is actually lower today (10%) than it was in 1908 (15%), largely because wood (technically a renewable biomass fuel) was displaced by coal. Today, solar and wind generation are increasing and make up most of the total nonhydro renewables.

As the primary transportation fuel, petroleum has remained a major component of energy consumption in the U.S. with no other fuel eating into its share as was the case with coal. The effects of affordable self-driving and/or electric vehicles remains to be seen, but will almost certainly become noticeable in the next decade.

The EIA data below shows in better detail the trending of U.S. energy consumption away from coal use and towards the use of natural gas over the last 15 years. The shift accelerated in the last few years as fracking opened up vast natural gas resources throughout the U.S. and environmental regulations favored gas for its less carbon intensive burn.

US total production

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