Coal on the Decline in the U.S. and China – 1/30/17

China and the U.S. are the first and second largest consumers of coal in the world, respectively. And though the governments of each nation are regarding the resource very differently for 2017, it doesn’t have much of a future in either.

China will invest $361 billion over the next three years in renewable power generation, while also canceling plans to build 103 coal-fired power plants, its National Energy Administration recently announced. If the Chinese government follows through on the plan, then it would mean stopping the addition of 120 GW of capacity, including projects already under construction.

The cancellations are in line with China’s goal of limiting its total coal-fired power generation capacity to 1,100 GW by 2020. Under the promise of reducing air pollution and greenhouse gas emission, coal use has been on the decline in China since 2013 and cleaner sources of power have account for a larger share of new additions each year.

Still, implementing the cuts could prove difficult. China is building more capacity than it needs for a number of reasons including the fact that power plant projects are popular way for local governments to raise tax revenue and employ citizens. It is unclear if local officials will play along with canceling contracts when the political cost of doing so is high. Unfortunately for those officials, the directive names each project set for cancellation, so they are likely to face heavy pressure to comply.

In the U.S., coal is under also under threat, though for different reasons. Despite, promises to revive the industry from the executive branch, coal’s share of American electricity generation peaked long ago and all signs point to further decline.

Natural gas alone has devastated coal’s share of energy consumption. Even before the massive shale gas deposits came into play with the rise of fracking, natural gas was a competitive threat. Nowadays, between the low cost of gas and its relatively clean burn, coal can’t even compete with another fossil fuel, let alone renewables with fast-falling costs and popular support.

Fewer than 60,000 Americans now make their living mining while clean energy employs at least 2.5 million Americans.

On top of that, nearly half of American output is produced by companies in bankruptcy.

And utilities in the United States have only four coal-fired plants set to go online through 2020, with a combined capacity of less than 1 GW, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. For comparison, more than 13 GW of coal-fired capacity was retired in 2015.

Be it in China or the U.S., with or without government support, coal is set for continued decline for the foreseeable future.

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