Climate Change Talk Fills the Room at Davos – 1/24/17

Despite the shift in political weather in Washington, the captains of business and finance gathered in Davos are talking a lot about climate change.

The World Economic Forum is devoting 15 sessions of its 2017 annual meeting to climate change, and nine more to clean energy.

“The good thing is that the Paris agreement raised the bar for everyone,” said Ben van Beurden, the head of Royal Dutch Shell Plc, Europe’s largest oil group. “Everybody feels the obligation to act.”

Achieving the ambitions set out in Paris may require $13.5 trillion of spending through to 2030, according International Energy Agency (IEA) data that show the scale of the opportunity for business. Only last year, clean energy investment stood at $287.5 billion, data compiled by Bloomberg New Energy Finance indicate.

“The scale and scope of the investment flows on renewables shows it’s mainstream,” said David Turk, head of climate change at the IEA in Paris and a former senior U.S. climate diplomat.

A survey of 750 participants at this year’s meeting shows that extreme weather is considered the biggest global risk, outstripping migrations, natural catastrophe and terrorism.

In November’s follow-up meeting to the Paris agreement, nearly 200 nations, including China, vowed to step up their efforts to fight global warming.

China, which historically fought against climate change efforts, is now pushing the importance of the issue.

Chinese President Xi Jinping urged the U.S. to remain in the “hard won” Paris agreement during a Davos speech that touted the world’s largest polluter as a leader in the fight against global warming.

“Walking away” from the pact would endanger future generations, he said.

Earlier this month, China pledged to invest 2.5 trillion yuan ($360 billion) in renewable energy through 2020 to reduce greenhouse gases that cause global warming and China’s government has recently suspended 101 coal-power projects across 11 provinces as it moves toward cutting CO2 emissions.

China already spent almost $88 billion in 2016, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance, about a third more than the U.S. And China’s investment has already created 3.5 million renewable energy jobs that could grow to 13 million by 2020, according to the International Renewable Energy Agency.

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